Project Vlog – Butterick 6094 Mockup



I picked up Butterick 6094 back in May when a local store was going out of business.   I also found a beautiful rose print fabric that seemed perfect for the dress!  I showed them in a haul video HERE.  I was pretty nervous to cut into the fabric and knew I needed to be certain of the fit and construction before hand so it was crucial to make a mockup.

With my post 2 kids body I’m less and less sure about my size and fit than I ever have been.  So jumping right into making my final garment isn’t as much of an option these days.  Plus I wanted to make sure I understood all the pattern instructions since there were a few techniques I hadn’t done before.

A friend of mine gave me several bags of curtains from a house remodel and it was the perfect, free material to use for my mockup.

I vlogged the process in hopes that it would help some one else, or at least inspire someone else to give making a mockup a try.  Check out the video HERE!

In case you’re wondering…here is how the final dress turned out!

I’m super happy with the dress and will be sharing the stitch-by-stitch tutorial for it on Wednesday!  Have you given Butterick 6094 a try?  Would love to hear how yours turned out!  Until Wednesday, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

EASY Skinny Hair Scarf DIY



Last week I shared a pattern review for the 1940s style shorts made using Simplicity 8654.  The shorts were made using a sweet floral fabric and I knew the scraps would make an adorable skinny, vintage style scarf!  So I whipped one up and love how it turned out.  Only takes a few minutes to make and is definitely beginner friendly!

Check out the step-by-step scarf tutorial HERE!

Do you love vintage styles as much as I do, or would you work this into an everyday outfit??

Did you know that I have a vlog channel?!? I post a weekly vlog sharing little bits of my life and my sewing projects.  You can check it out HERE!

Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

Simplicity 8654 Pattern Review



This year I added to my Sew Your Stash goals to include using more of the 300+ patterns in my sewing collection.  I love sharing step-by-step tutorials so you all can sew the pattern along with me, but sometimes I can’t (or don’t want to) film the process.  Simplicity 8654 is one of those cases.  It was a project I wanted to whip up without having to worry about camera angles and all of that.

I made the pleated shorts option using the floral viscose from the October Sew Hayley Jane box.  You can check out that unboxing HERE!

I wanted to share the shorts after they were completed, so I thought it would be fun to try something new…a pattern review.  It’s my first pattern review so I covered the basics such as how easy/difficult the instructions were to follow, adjustments I made, final fit, changes I would make for next time, and more.

(BTW I apologize for the poor photo quality…I had my camera on the wrong settings).

Anyway, check out my full pattern review with additional photos HERE!

I would love to know if you have tried Simplicity 8654 and your thoughts on the pattern.  Also did you like this kind of video, or would you prefer a DIY Inspiration style video for non tutorial videos??

Make sure to check back on Wednesday for a tutorial on the skinny hair scarf I made to match my shorts.  Until then, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

 

How to Sew a Zipper in a Seam



I have been challenging myself to use more of the sewing patterns in my stash.  Several of the garments I’ve been sewing include a zipper in the side or back seam.  I’ve had several people tell me they are afraid of working with zippers.  So this week I wanted to show step-by-step how to insert a zipper in a seam and how easy it can be!  I also included one of the ways to add a waistband to finish off a skirt or trousers.

Watch the full tutorial HERE!

I’ll have more sewing basics videos like this coming soon.  Are there certain techniques you want me to cover??  Leave a comment letting me know.  Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

Sewing Pattern Organization – An Updated System!


In my recent sewing pattern collection post I showed every single sewing pattern I own and answered some frequently asked questions about my patterns.  One question I get very often is how I store my 300+ patterns.  For YEARS I did not have a organization or storage solution at all.  I had a few crates, boxes, bins, stacks, etc of patterns scattered all over my sewing room.  I had no idea how to tackle them and where to get started.

I finally got fed up with my lack of a solution and dove in head first!  I used to store all my sewing patterns with the envelope in a plastic sheet protector and the pattern/instructions in a manila envelope like I showed HERE.  This system worked fine until I had over 100 patterns, then I got tired of purchasing more and more envelopes and sheet protectors.

I ended up keeping that system for my vintage patterns so they are protected from being damaged any more than they already are.  The rest of my patterns are stored in order by company and pattern number in wooden crates.

I go into more details and show everything in the video HERE!

I am so happy with this new system and I can’t believe I waited SO LONG to actually do it!  I would love to hear your thoughts on how I’ve got my patterns organized.  Is it similar to how you keep yours?  If not, what do you do differently?

By the way, I’ve added to my Sew Your Stash goals for 2018 to use more of the sewing patterns that I own.  In the past three months I’ve used SIX of my patterns!  That is a huge accomplishment since it had been since Halloween before that.  I’m having so much fun creating fun garments for myself and can’t wait to share some of them with you all!  So make sure to check back soon for more updates on the patterns I’m using.  Until then, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

 

Churn Dash | Sampler Sew Along



It’s time for the fourth block tutorial in the Whitney Sews Sampler Sew Along!  Haven’t heard about it yet?!?  Each month I’ll be sharing a step by step tutorial to make a traditional quilt block as well as how to sew the blocks together to create a sampler style quilt that finishes in a great lap quilt/baby quilt size.

This week I’m sharing a tutorial for the Churn Dash Block. This block has been around since the first half of the 1800s.

I share the step-by-step instructions for sewing this block in the video HERE!

Don’t forget to share a pic of your finished block with #SamplerSewAlong so we all see it!

If you want more details on the supplies I use in my videos, you can find them all HERE!  I set up an Amazon storefront so all my most used items are in one place and if you use my link to purchase anything I get a small percentage for referring you and that goes to help create more quality content like this video tutorial.

Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

Easy Gathered Skirt How to


Could these two be any cuter?!?  My girls love wearing skirts, so my mom and I thought it would be fun to let the kids pick out some cute fabrics and we would use them to make skirts.  The skirts are so easy to make that even a beginner sewer came make one in an afternoon.

The first thing you need is to pick out some fabrics.  We went to JoAnns to get some fun cotton printed fabrics, but you can pull from your stash as well.  We ended up getting several fabrics while there and you can see everything we got in our haul HERE!

The amount of fabric you get depends on the size you need the finished skirt.  The fabric needs to be approximately double the person’s waist size.  My kids both have 20 inch waists so I’m using the full width of the fabric which is about 44 inches.  If the person is larger than 25 inches you will need to purchase more.  For the length we went with a half yard.  That was perfect for my oldest, Peyton, but I needed to trim about 1.5 inches off for my youngest.  If your skirt ends up shorter than you wanted (or your kids go through a growth spurt!) you can add lace, ruffles, or other trims at the bottom for extra length.

In addition to your fabric you will need 3/4 inch elastic and your basic sewing supplies.  You can see my favorite supplies to use HERE!

Now that you have your supplies it’s time to get started!  Follow along with the step-by-step instructions in the video HERE!

See!  So simple to make, but absolutely adorable!  If you enjoyed the tutorial make sure to share the link and if you make your own skirt I would love to see a pic so feel free to post on facebook or instagram with #WhitneySews.  I’ll be back next Wednesday with the next video in the Sampler Sew Along.  Until then, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

DIY Lightsaber Carrying Case


This week I wanted to share a fun project I made when my hubby requested a bag to carry his lightsabers in to and from JediOKC events.  I put the project off for a while because I was nervous about coming up with a design that would work well for the large size.  We finally came up with the idea of a carrying case that rolls up and fastens similar to a makeup brush roll or a crochet hook roll.

Check out my video all about the carrying case HERE and below will be some written directions for anyone wanting to make their own.

I started with a package of Bosal In-R Foam Plus measuring 36 x 58 inches.  It is a foam stabilizer that is fusible on both sides and easy to sew through.  I laid the lightsaber pieces out on the foam and marked the design I wanted around them with a marker.  The carrying case needed a large pocket along the bottom, one smaller pocket up higher, a small zipper bag, elastic to secure the longer items, and a flap at the top to make sure everything stays in place and is protected.  Then I used those markings to get the measurements for all the pieces.

 

The outer and lining fabrics are fused to the foam stabilizer then trimmed to the 36 x 58 inch size.

The remaining pieces were cut using the following measurements-

Bottom Pocket – 25 x 36 inches (1) fabric & (1) interfacing

Top Flap – 16 x 34 inches (2) fabric & (1) interfacing

Small Upper Pocket – 8 x 8 inches (2) fabric & (1) interfacing

Zipper Pocket – 6 x 15 inches (1) fabric & (1) interfacing  –

 

Fuse the interfacing onto the corresponding pieces.  I like to purchase THIS interfacing by the bolt and use it for lots of projects. Fold the large pocket piece in half with the right sides on the outside and press the folded edge.  Place the two flap pieces right sides together and sew along one long side and both short sides.  Turn right sides out, press, and top stitch those three sides.  Lay the two small pocket pieces right sides together and sew around leaving a small opening in one of the sides.  Turn right sides out, press, and top stitch.  Follow THIS tutorial to create zipper pocket.

After the outer and lining fabrics have been fused to the foam lay the large pocket along the bottom lining up the short sides and the bottom edge.  Sew along those three sides leaving the top folded edge of the pocket open.  Center the flap along the top edge and sew the long side to attach.  Lay out your lightsaber pieces and mark where the large pocket needs to be sewn to divide it into multiple pockets.  Also pin and sew the small pocket and zipper pocket into place with a top stitch.  Add extra stitching at the top edges of the small pocket so it doesn’t start coming off later.  Then cut 2 inch wide elastic so it is long enough to go over each piece and be securely sewn on each side.  Sew each elastic piece into place.

Trim up the outer edges if needed then use 3 inch side strips of fabric to bind the edges as shown in THIS tutorial.  Create a carrying strap as shown in THIS video, just skip the step where the clips are added in the video.  I would recommend adding bosal in-r foam to the strap.  I didn’t and wish that I had!  Lastly cut two elastic straps that are long enough to wrap around the case with a couple of inches of overlap.  Sew the elastic to the case with the ends of the strap tucked underneath.  Refer to the video for closeups on this step.

I hope this was helpful! I know not everyone is interested in Star Wars DIYS and even less people need a lightsaber bag, but it was a fun project and I wanted to share it.  If you found this post helpful please let me know in a comment down below.  Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

 

Memory Bear With Overalls – Sewing How to



After posting my step-by-step memory bear tutorial earlier this year I got TONS of requests to show how I made some of my bears look like they are wearing overalls.  This was a fun little detail I came up with for a custom order.  I was making bears for a family who had lost a loved one and he ALWAYS wore overalls.  So I knew I had to find a way to incorporate that into the bears.  I love how it turned out and so did the family.

The overalls detailing is done using the same memory bear pattern as the rest of my bear tutorials – Simplicity’s It’s So Easy A2115.  It is out of print, but a lot of people have still had some luck finding it in their local Wal-Mart.  If you can’t find that pattern you can use Simplicity 5461 which is an updated version that is only for sale online.

You will need to make some markings on your bear body front pattern for the seam and strap placement.  This is easiest if you have transferred your printed pattern over to plastic templates like I showed in a tutorial HERE!  Then use some 1/2 inch wide washi tape for the marks.  This allows you to place the plastic templates over your pieces as you work with them and line everything up perfectly.

See where to place the tape on your template, the pieces you need to cut and how to sew it all together in my step-by-step video HERE!

I hope you love this custom bear detail and give it a try when making your memory bears!

If you want to see more of the bears I make you can check them out on my Whitney Sews Memories facebook page.  Want more info on some of the sewing and cutting supplies I love using??  Check them out HERE on my Amazon page!  Anytime you purchase an item through my Amazon link I earn a small percentage and that helps fund future sewing tutorials.

Let me know if there are any other memory bear sewing techniques you want to see a tutorial on.  Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-

Puss in the Corner | Sampler Sew Along



It’s time for the third block tutorial in the Whitney Sews Sampler Sew Along!  Haven’t heard about it yet?!?  Each month I’ll be sharing a step by step tutorial to make a traditional quilt block as well as how to sew the blocks together to create a sampler style quilt that finishes in a great lap quilt/baby quilt size.

This week I’m sharing a tutorial for the Puss in the Corner Block. This block is a version of the basic nine patch block that has been around since the early years of quilt block piecing.

 

I share the step-by-step instructions from cutting to sewing this block in the video HERE!

Don’t forget to share a pic of your finished block with #SamplerSewAlong so we all see it!

If you want more details on the supplies I use in my videos, you can find them all HERE!  I set up an Amazon storefront so all my most used items are in one place and if you use my link to purchase anything I get a small percentage for referring you and that goes to help create more quality content like this video tutorial.

Until next time, Happy Sewing!

-Whitney-